August 5, 2012
longreads:

In Arizona’s Maricopa County, 80-year-old Joe Arpaio has made a name for himself “for being not just the toughest but the most corrupt and abusive sheriff in America.” He’s now being sued by the Justice Department for civil rights violations against Latinos:

Arpaio began focusing on illegal immigration about six years ago, after he watched an ambitious politician named Andrew Thomas get elected chief prosecutor of Maricopa County by promising to crack down on illegal immigrants. In 2006, shortly before the Department of Homeland Security empowered local law-enforcement agencies to act as an arm of the federal immigration effort, Arpaio created a Human Smuggling Unit – and used Thomas’ somewhat twisted interpretation of the law to focus not on busting coyotes and other smugglers, but on going after the smuggled.
The move may have been indefensible from a legal standpoint, but it was political gold: Arpaio quickly ramped up his arrest numbers, bringing him a round of fresh media attention. The sheriff made a splash by setting up roadblocks to detain any drivers who looked like they could be in the U.S. illegally – a virtual license to racially profile Hispanics. Reports of pull-overs justified by little or no discernible traffic violations were soon widespread: Latinos in the northeastern part of the county, one study shows, were nine times more likely to be pulled over for the same infractions as other drivers. Arpaio’s men, the Justice Department alleges, relied on factors ‘such as whether passengers look “disheveled” or do not speak English.’ Some stops were justified after the fact: A group of Latinos who were photographed sitting in a car, neatly dressed, were described in the police report as appearing ‘dirty,’ the ostensible rationale for the pull-over. Testifying on the stand on July 24th in a federal trial over his department’s blatant record of racial profiling, Arpaio himself acknowledged that he once called the crackdown a ‘pure program to go after the illegals and not the crime first.’

“The Long, Lawless Ride of Sheriff Joe Arpaio.” — Joe Hagan, Rolling Stone
More Hagan

 His second book, published in 2008, is modestly titled Joe’s Law: America’s Toughest Sheriff Takes on Illegal Immigration, Drugs and Everything Else That Threatens America. 

longreads:

In Arizona’s Maricopa County, 80-year-old Joe Arpaio has made a name for himself “for being not just the toughest but the most corrupt and abusive sheriff in America.” He’s now being sued by the Justice Department for civil rights violations against Latinos:

Arpaio began focusing on illegal immigration about six years ago, after he watched an ambitious politician named Andrew Thomas get elected chief prosecutor of Maricopa County by promising to crack down on illegal immigrants. In 2006, shortly before the Department of Homeland Security empowered local law-enforcement agencies to act as an arm of the federal immigration effort, Arpaio created a Human Smuggling Unit – and used Thomas’ somewhat twisted interpretation of the law to focus not on busting coyotes and other smugglers, but on going after the smuggled.

The move may have been indefensible from a legal standpoint, but it was political gold: Arpaio quickly ramped up his arrest numbers, bringing him a round of fresh media attention. The sheriff made a splash by setting up roadblocks to detain any drivers who looked like they could be in the U.S. illegally – a virtual license to racially profile Hispanics. Reports of pull-overs justified by little or no discernible traffic violations were soon widespread: Latinos in the northeastern part of the county, one study shows, were nine times more likely to be pulled over for the same infractions as other drivers. Arpaio’s men, the Justice Department alleges, relied on factors ‘such as whether passengers look “disheveled” or do not speak English.’ Some stops were justified after the fact: A group of Latinos who were photographed sitting in a car, neatly dressed, were described in the police report as appearing ‘dirty,’ the ostensible rationale for the pull-over. Testifying on the stand on July 24th in a federal trial over his department’s blatant record of racial profiling, Arpaio himself acknowledged that he once called the crackdown a ‘pure program to go after the illegals and not the crime first.’

“The Long, Lawless Ride of Sheriff Joe Arpaio.” — Joe Hagan, Rolling Stone

More Hagan

 His second book, published in 2008, is modestly titled Joe’s Law: America’s Toughest Sheriff Takes on Illegal Immigration, Drugs and Everything Else That Threatens America

arpayaso!

July 29, 2012
longreads:

A memoir of “growing up black, on parole, in Mississippi”:

I enroll at Jackson State University in the Spring semester, where my mother teaches Political Science. Even though, I’m not really living at home, everyday Mama and I fight over my job at Cutco and her staying with her boyfriend and her not letting me use the car to get to my second job at an HIV hospice since my license is suspended. Really, we’re fighting because she raised me to never ever forget I was on parole, which means no black hoodies in wrong neighborhoods, no jogging at night, hands in plain sight at all times in public, no intimate relationships with white women, never driving over the speed limit or doing those rolling stops at stop signs, always speaking the king’s English in the presence of white folks, never being outperformed in school or in public by white students and most importantly, always remembering that no matter what, white folks will do anything to get you.
Mama’s antidote to being born a black boy on parole in Central Mississippi is not for us to seek freedom; it’s to insist on excellence at all times. Mama takes it personal when she realizes that I realize she is wrong. There ain’t no antidote to life, I tell her. How free can you be if you really accept that white folks are the traffic cops of your life? Mama tells me that she is not talking about freedom. She says that she is talking about survival.

“How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America: A Remembrance.” — Kiese Laymon, Gawker
More Gawker

longreads:

A memoir of “growing up black, on parole, in Mississippi”:

I enroll at Jackson State University in the Spring semester, where my mother teaches Political Science. Even though, I’m not really living at home, everyday Mama and I fight over my job at Cutco and her staying with her boyfriend and her not letting me use the car to get to my second job at an HIV hospice since my license is suspended. Really, we’re fighting because she raised me to never ever forget I was on parole, which means no black hoodies in wrong neighborhoods, no jogging at night, hands in plain sight at all times in public, no intimate relationships with white women, never driving over the speed limit or doing those rolling stops at stop signs, always speaking the king’s English in the presence of white folks, never being outperformed in school or in public by white students and most importantly, always remembering that no matter what, white folks will do anything to get you.

Mama’s antidote to being born a black boy on parole in Central Mississippi is not for us to seek freedom; it’s to insist on excellence at all times. Mama takes it personal when she realizes that I realize she is wrong. There ain’t no antidote to life, I tell her. How free can you be if you really accept that white folks are the traffic cops of your life? Mama tells me that she is not talking about freedom. She says that she is talking about survival.

“How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America: A Remembrance.” — Kiese Laymon, Gawker

More Gawker

February 1, 2012

is this real life?

a mildly mentally disabled girl walks down the hall of her high school, and her inner thoughts are supposedly narrated by a female, British voice. According to the narration, she can easily have any dude east of the Mississippi: her objection to the Irish exchange student was that he grinned too much and it made him look insane; her objection to American of indeterminable race was that his mohawk looked like a squirrel glued to his head; her objection of the Asian guy was “No-Chang-Do. I’m no rice queen.” She rejected each candidate based on behavior (excessive grinning), style (bad mohawk), and RACE? MILLIONS OF PEOPLE WATCH THIS SHOW? AND THAT KIND OF A REACTION TO A HUMAN BEING IS OKAY? “NO, THANKS. YOU’RE, LIKE, ASIAN.” whatishappening.

October 30, 2011
Rice Race

harunwasagoon:

halloween party last night. 

this guy i hadn’t seen in years came in black face

my roommate’s boyfriend came dressed as an “arab”

i was asked if i was dressed in a “traditional regional garb” because i was wearing a lot of gold and shawls and was barefoot

i went to sleep at 12:30

the party went on outside of my door til 4

i’m too old and weary for this shit

I went to get my green card fixed up on Friday. The guy who was at the door was a white guy in his early 40s. He had a very angular face and sharp eyes tucked under severe brow ridges. He waited for me to turn off my phone. I found him intimidating. When I went to the grey chairs and he called me back I thought I’d done something wrong. He said “oh did I say the grey chairs? I meant the red chairs, sorry sweetheart.” I wasn’t sure how to take to the ‘sweetheart’. The guy who helped me was black, in his mid 50s. He waved me in with a Canto-Viet family of 4: an older couple, their daughter who looks to be in her mid to late 20s and her toddler daughter. I told the officer I wasn’t with them. He stopped for a moment and said “I knew that! I’m a professional!” and flashed a big professional grin at me. He told me to stay in his office anyway. Their problem was that the man’s birthday had been May 12th on his card, but December 5th on his driver’s license. His wife’s birthday was July 9th on her card, but September 7th on her state ID. Apparently the daughter had been taking them around all day finding documents and such. He told them that they just screwed up because the green card information always trumps any DMV documentation. Eventually it seemed like he was forcing them to agree to what he deemed was their birthdays. He was so friendly and goofy that I thought I couldn’t really tell if he was playing the part of someone official having a ‘wink wink’ moment and being meta/ironic about it or if he was really basically telling them to not go through the trouble of correcting their birthdays. They looked baffled and the daughter was asked to ask them in Vietnamese what their birthdays are and they couldn’t answer. The officer started this belly laugh and said ‘you don’t know your own birthdays!’ I left feeling very confused too because I wasn’t sure of what I had seen. I can’t imagine a different race experience; I can’t imagine a different immigration experience. I can’t imagine what I’ve seen without fearing that I’ve imagined incorrectly and misjudged one party or both. Then I thought, the whole episode would have been totally avoidable if they were both born after the 12th of their respective birth months. The sadness became unwieldy but slippery. I couldn’t get a firm hold and I couldn’t let go. When it was my turn the officer and I chatted quite a bit and he told me about a daughter that is now going to a school in Texas. I wondered in my head if that was the historically black university this girl from my middle school went to. Then I wondered if I shouldn’t have thought that. I talked about school quite a bit and I wondered if I was being a typical Asian girl. He made fun of me for not putting any effort into my hair. I thought he was hilarious and that his funniness depended largely on his diction and tone, but when I repeat his jokes to other people I wonder if I shouldn’t try to ‘sound black’ because anyway at the very least I’m embarrassingly bad at it and that ought to be offensive to people who love a good racial joke. His age or stature must’ve done something for his rich baritone, I’d think. When I got out it was bright outside. I passed his floor to ceiling windows while pretending to look at my phone. The sadness took greater hold of me and I was no longer relieved I’d finished a long put-off task.

(via spatiotemporalcookies-deactivat)

5:34pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZYUzQyBJ9-Mb
  
Filed under: race 
October 23, 2011
you guys i think “upscale” is interwebz speek for “not a prostitute”, and “quality” obviously means “older gay needs beard”.

you guys i think “upscale” is interwebz speek for “not a prostitute”, and “quality” obviously means “older gay needs beard”.

(via slowheart-deactivated20120130)

11:02pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZYUzQyB2LyYc
  
Filed under: race sex dating 
August 24, 2011
latimes:

Concerns about lack of minorities in NBC’s family: Latino groups raise an issue with KNBC, and NBC’s fall schedule shows a reversal from characters’ ethnic diversity last season.
Photo:  Boris Kodjoe as Steven Bloom and Gugu Mbatha-Raw as Samantha Bloom in the short-lived show “Undercovers.” Credit: Frank Ockenfels / NBC

this disturbs me.

latimes:

Concerns about lack of minorities in NBC’s family: Latino groups raise an issue with KNBC, and NBC’s fall schedule shows a reversal from characters’ ethnic diversity last season.

Photo: Boris Kodjoe as Steven Bloom and Gugu Mbatha-Raw as Samantha Bloom in the short-lived show “Undercovers.” Credit: Frank Ockenfels / NBC

this disturbs me.

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

July 8, 2011
"You know, I’m uh, I’m out there mowing the lawn for a Jaguar commercial."

— this is a phrase i’m inventing for whenever i consciously/unconsciously, intentionally/unintentionally, voluntarily/involuntarily contribute to white, upper-middle class entitlement…

June 4, 2011
"Ironically, writes Silvio Torres-Saillant, Simon Bolivar’s desideratum of a unified Latin American nation and the idea upheld by Eugenio Maria de Hostos of an Antillean federation find in us a strange kind of fulfillment. We have come to articulate a collective identity, no in our native homelands, as Bolivar and Hostos had dreamed, but within the insecure space of the diaspora."

silvio torres-saillant

(from magical urbanism, by mike davis)

February 16, 2011

i saw this on a friend’s facebook and i was like aw this is adorable, but why did they have a video of this? and then at the end the lines ‘our children are colour blind, shouldn’t we keep them that way?’ came on and i was actually disappointed. is it wrong that i think it’s wrong that it was used to propagate something? even a good thing? does everyone else watch the video and think aw how cute! and then, my! and for a good cause too! and they are doubly bubbly? is it not normal that i became depressed instead? probably it’s just one of those days again.

5:43pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZYUzQy36hbzz
Filed under: race children 
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